Hell It's Mine

What we think, what we speak and what we do are never in tune with one another. This page is dedicated to what I think.

It’s after a long time I’ve read a book which covered what’s close to my heart – a love for books. It’s the kind of book which needs to be savoured, for some of the sentences were so easily relatable by the bibliophiles. And this is the first book which I’ve read after I had …

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Stories steeped in mythology are my all time favourites and I won’t deny it. That’s the one main reason why I got hooked to Amish (and also some of the other Indian writers) in the first place. The completely different perspective, or way of looking at these mythological characters makes for a very interesting read, and of course makes us question the age-old, handed-down-the-generations versions.

After successfully plowing through pages and pages of creative storytelling and political intrigues of places described so romantically that it left me happily confused as to where I wanted to go first, I thought I was done with it. Then started the hype about the beginning of the last season, Season 8. That got me …

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Befuddled mind, groggy eyes, croaky voice and sore feet – all symptomatic of a hectic and sleep deprived week. And I can’t even complain, after all it’s self inflicted. I always knew I was addicted but I didn’t realise how bad it would get if left unchecked.

If anything, you can call me an impulsive reader – it catches my attention and I pick the book up – and can read almost anything. But self-help or management or such genres were never on my list. The first time I heard Simon Sinek was in a small video clip forwarded in one of the WhatsApp groups where he talks about the millenniums in the workplace. I just loved it. It had hit it right on the head. Then I got to see a few more video clips, courtesy WhatsApp, and by then I was utterly impressed with the ideas of this person. What I liked most was its simplicity. The things he said did not need us to be a qualified rocket scientist. Au contraire, all it needed is we be true to our beliefs and not delude ourselves. So, when I chanced upon this book by him, there was no way I was going to give it a miss.

The current breed of Indian writers is a brave lot. They are not scared of experimenting with the set-in-stone mythologies which have been part of our ‘cultural upbringing’ diet for generations. The Rama of Ramayana and Krishna of the Mahabharata have been humanised, making their follies look more acceptable; Ravana is no longer the blood thirsty brute nor are the Kauravas just power hungry brothers.